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Halitosis

How many people suffer from chronic halitosis (bad breath) in the US?

The answer to this question is: Somewhere between 35% and 45% of the total population, or 80 million people.

Halitosis

Halitosis, better known as bad breath, is triggered by anaerobic bacteria that excretes sulfur compounds. In layman’s terms, bad breath is typically caused by bacteria and food particles that are not removed from your mouth during routine brushing, flossing, and use of mouthwash.

The best way to prevent bad breath is to practice GREAT oral hygiene habits and keep your dental visits routine. At your routine visits, plaque, tartar, and bacteria that cannot be removed by brushing and flossing will be removed.

To avoid bad breath, try the following:

  • Brushing twice per day with proper form (don’t forget your tongue, cheeks, and roof of your mouth)
  • Consider using a tongue scraper
  • Floss every day
  • Use mouth wash
  • If you are a tobacco user, stop using
  • Stay hydrated, dry mouth can cause bad breath
  • Improve your diet (eat more carrots, celery, and apples)
  • Chew sugarless chewing gum

Schedule an Appointment

Do you need to schedule a dental appointment? Remember, they are imperative in eliminating bad breath.

Dr. Van Treese in Sidney, OH, serving patients from all around Shelby County, is always welcoming new patients. So, if you are new to the office, or an existing patient, schedule your appointment today!

Gum Disease

Do you have healthy gums, or not? You may not have the slightest clue about the health of your gums—but you should. In Dr. Van Treese’s last blog article, he introduced the importance of healthy gums, and what other health issues can stem from gum disease.

Gum Disease

Knowing the health of your gums is not always easy, especially when you don’t maintain routine visits to the dentist. Unfortunately, gum disease does not show many signs or symptoms, and is often referred to as a “silent disease.” 

A couple signs of gum disease that you can look for include:

  • Your gums bleeding while you brush or floss.
  • Your gums appearing bright red and puffy.

If you think you might have gum disease, or do not know for sure if you do or not, you may want to consider visiting your dentist. Your dentist has special tools that can determine the health of your gums, if you have gum disease, how developed your gum disease may be, and what a successful treatment plan would be. 

Below, Dr. Van Treese offers a few tips to keeping your gums healthy. Please note that these practices should not replace your routine dental appointments and professional cleanings. 

  • Brush your gums twice a day. While you are brushing your teeth, remember to gently brush your gums as well. Brushing your gums can help to remove bacteria that is on your gums and along your gum line.
  • Brush your top teeth from the top down and your bottom teeth from the bottom up. This brushing technique will help to free up and bacteria or plaque that may be sitting on your gum line. 
  • Remember to floss. When your dentist asks you about your flossing habits, it is not for fun. It is because flossing is just as important as brushing your teeth. 

Your dentist is well equipped to examine your mouth and determine the health of your gums. Your dentist may also put together a treatment plan to restore your gums to health. This treatment plan may require the work of a periodontist as well.